The Statue of Liberty in New York: Admission, Height & Fun Facts

Petr Novák

The Statue of Liberty is situated on Liberty Island, just outside New York City, and is, without exaggeration, known to everyone. Including the pedestal, this 93-metre tall statue, carrying a torch in its right hand and the Declaration of Independence in its left, is perhaps the most famous symbol of America. But what does its crown symbolize, and how can one reach it?

Statue of Liberty in New York City | © Unsplash.com

The Statue of Liberty in New York City: Height, Location, and Crown

The Statue of Liberty itself stands 151 ft tall, with an additional 154 ft at its base. The enormity of the statue is evident from the fact that its index finger alone is 7.87 ft long and its right arm, holding the torch, is 42 ft long.

The statue, made of copper, steel, concrete, and granite, features a torch flame that glows due to gold foil.

The Statue of Liberty (map) is located on Liberty Island, south of Ellis Island, and is 2.5 miles, as the crow flies, from the southern tip of Manhattan. Though both islands are beyond the New Jersey border, by agreement, they remain part of New York State. The USA federal government took over their administration in 1800.

The French gifted the Statue of Liberty to the Americans, and it was erected near New York City on October 28, 1886. Sculptors Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and Gustave Eiffel, who was also the creator of the famous Eiffel Tower in Paris, designed and constructed it. The Statue of Liberty is full of various symbols and references. The torch in the right hand is supposed to symbolize progress, while the book in the left hand, inscribed with “JULY IV MDCCLXXVI,” refers to the Declaration of Independence.

The Statue of Liberty’s crown, adorned with seven rays, symbolizes freedom radiating across the seven seas to the seven continents. The Statue of Liberty has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1984. Copies of New York’s Statue of Liberty can be found in Paris and Las Vegas.

Admission to the Statue of Liberty, Opening Hours, and Access to the Crown

The Statue of Liberty is open year-round, except on Thanksgiving and December 25. Tickets are exclusively sold online at the official CityExperiences.com website and can be purchased several months in advance, as they can sell out early during peak tourist season.

Other companies also sell tickets for the Statue of Liberty at a higher price. It is strongly advised against purchasing tickets from street hawkers (despite the lower price), as one can easily be deceived and end up going nowhere.

There are several types of tickets available for the Statue of Liberty. If one type is sold out, try choosing a boarding location in neighboring New Jersey.

Electronic tickets can either be printed before departure or alternatively, picked up on the day of payment at the Will Call window at the ferry departure point.

🎟️ General Admission

The basic ticket type only includes a visit to the Statue of Liberty, not inside it. The price covers an audio guide, admission to the Statue of Liberty Museum on Liberty Island, and a ferry ride from Manhattan (or New Jersey) to Liberty Island, then to Ellis Island and back to the point of departure. Admission costs are $25 per adult, $16.00 per child aged 4 to 12, and $22.00 per senior citizen aged 62 and older.

🎟️ Pedestal Reserve

The ticket includes transportation to the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, and back to Manhattan or New Jersey. Additionally, you get access to the base of the Statue of Liberty.

The ticket price for an adult is $25, for a child aged 4 to 12 is $16.30, and for seniors aged 62 and older, it’s $22.30.

🎟️ Crown Reserve

The most attractive and most expensive ticket option also includes access to the crown of the Statue of Liberty. The time in the crown is limited to 10 minutes per person and 162 steps must be climbed. No elevator is available. A maximum of 4 tickets can be booked per reservation.

There is a high demand for tickets to the Crown, therefore availability is low. Ticket prices should start at $24.80 per person (January 2024).

Other Information about Admission to the Statue of Liberty

If you buy a ticket for 2 pm or any later time, you’ll only be able to visit either the Statue of Liberty or Ellis Island.

If you plan to visit the observation deck at the Empire State Building and other sights in New York City, consider purchasing The New York Pass. For one price, you can get tickets to New York’s most famous attractions, saving you dozens of dollars.

How to Get to the Statue of Liberty

The ferry to Liberty Island departs from Battery Park in southern Manhattan. The first service departs at 9:00 am, the last one leaves Liberty Island at 6:15 pm, and the final one leaves Ellis Island at 6:30 pm. It’s recommended to arrive at least 30 minutes before departure, as lines tend to be long.

The other option is New Jersey, where ferries depart from Liberty State Park.

The ferry schedule changes quite often, so it’s better to check and take a picture on your phone before you go. Allow about 3 hours for the trip to the Statue of Liberty. If you plan on stopping at Ellis Island (ferry included), expect it to take 5-6 hours.

It’s recommended to take the first ferry in the morning. With each successive one, the island becomes more crowded and the lines get longer. On the boat, choose a seat on the side facing Manhattan. Once the boat pulls up to the Statue of Liberty, you’ll have the best view and the best photos.

Make sure to pack a snack and plenty of drink for the trip, and don’t forget sunglasses, a hat, and sunscreen in the summer. Delays might be caused by the mandatory personal inspection combined with passing through a metal detector. Backpacks and other luggage must be left in the storage room.

Facts About the Statue of Liberty

The Statue of Liberty’s light green color is the result of nature’s impact on its copper surface, which is merely 2.4 mm thick. An even rarer material is used for the statue’s torch, which was covered with 24-carat gold foil during the 1986 restoration.

The official name of the Statue of Liberty is not “Statue of Liberty” but “Liberty Enlightening the World”. The statue’s head was displayed at the 1878 World’s Fair in Paris before its journey to the USA. The statue was designed to represent Libertas, the Roman goddess of freedom. The French model Isabella Eugénie Boyer, the widow of Isaac Merritt Singer, the inventor of the sewing machine, served as the sculptor’s model.

When the wind speeds reach approximately 50 mph around the Statue of Liberty, the torch can sway up to 13.00 cm.

Photos of the Statue of Liberty

Statue of Liberty NYC | © PeterJBellis

Statue of Liberty | © aa7ae

Statue of Liberty, New York | © Thomas J. Matthews

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